Film Reviews

Review: Tokyo Ghoul

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Tokyo Ghoul is one of my favourite anime, so when I saw that a cinema near me was doing a screening of the release of the live action film, I jumped at the chance to get tickets.

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In all, I really enjoyed the movie. It’s not perfect by a long stretch, but it’s a really good adaptation of the anime and manga, and stuck faithfully to its predecessors. There weren’t really any moments I could nail down where I could comfortably say “It didn’t happen like that in the anime/manga”, and trust me, I’m always the first one to point out that sort of thing.

Tokyo Ghoul is let down by some of it’s not-so-special effects. So much of the plot is reliant on CGI, so it’s really disappointing that the CGI was so subpar. It really took me out of it seeing the ghouls fighting using their kagunes which were just laughably bad. Really, I think this is the only negative I can say about the whole experience.

The movie does showcase some really stellar acting. Masataka Kubota in particular was especially convincing as Ken Kaneki, managing to show off his inner turmoil at becoming a ghoul. There are some really great moments later on in the movie where Ken is being overtaken by his ghoul side where you can really feel how the experience is affecting him and how troubled his mind is.

7 stars

Film Reviews

Review: Downsizing

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Downsizing is a peculiar one. I think it’s really hard to make a ‘serious film’ where the key concept of the movie is that people are shrinking themselves. I don’t know if that’s because I was a child in a time where Honey, I Shrunk The Kids and its various spin-offs were a big thing, but to me the idea of a person shrinking is just funny.

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The thing with Downsizing, though it does have its funny moments, is it’s not really a comedy. The concept of ‘downsizing’ is so that a person takes up less space on the planet and has less of an effect on the environment, so the movie is a pretty serious one with a focus on environmentalism and the selfishness of humanity.

Downsizing doesn’t really deliver its message with much impact. Yes, we all know that the Earth is struggling to cope with the volume of people who inhabit it, as well as the way they treat it. Past this it doesn’t really offer much more exploration into things. There’s no focus on how things change once the project begins, how things are developing or whether the project met its aims. Things just happen, and we’re expected to accept that.

Downsizing touches on a lot of points that would have been really interesting to explore; the import/export business in the miniature world, the wealth divide in Leisure Land, politics between the ‘normies’ and the downsizers to name a few examples, but it doesn’t expand on any of them. It’s disappointing, but throughout the movie Downsizing has a habit of introducing an interesting topic and just leaving it, undeveloped.

The protagonist, Paul (Matt Damon) doesn’t really develop much, and the same can be said for most of the characters. Everyone ends the movie as they started, there’s no journey, no development, nothing to keep you engaged and the movie feels every second of its 2hr15 runtime.

 

Film Reviews, Films

Review: Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

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Going into Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri I had very little idea about the film. I thought vaguely, maybe it won’t actually be about billboards, and the billboards might be a sort of metaphor? Nope, it’s about billboards.

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The billboards, whilst not necessarily a metaphor, are a representation of ­­­Mildred’s struggle to get closure and justice for her murdered daughter. Frustrated, Mildred (played by Frances McDormand) rents out the three billboards and puts up some choice words for the local police chief essentially questioning whether he has done his job properly.

There’s a pretty stellar cast, with Frances McDormand being joined by Woody Harrelson and Sam Rockwell, who is particularly fantastic throughout the whole film, portraying a really complex character perfectly. Everything is sublime and it’s really hard to find any faults in the whole movie.

I don’t want to delve too deeply into things, as I think it’s good to go into Three Billboards as I did, not really knowing much about it. I will say it’s a wonderfully emotional film with a really engaging plot.

Three Billboards does comedy and drama exceptionally well, giving you moments that are genuinely hilarious before smacking you in the gut with some well-delivered emotional trauma. The whole thing keeps you on your toes, in a good way, and you’re on an emotional rollercoaster along with the characters throughout the film’s 115 minutes.

I can’t recommend Three Billboards enough.

 

Film Reviews

Review: Assassin’s Creed

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Historically, movie adaptations of video games have got a bad rep. Perhaps the translation of game to movie doesn’t quite mesh, changing an interactive activity into a passive one, or maybe it’s simply because the majority of attempts have been terrible. There are, of course, exceptions to the rule, so where does Assassin’s Creed fit into the spectrum?

Read the rest of my review at Filmoria.

Film News, Films

News: Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje cast as Killer Croc

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Rumour on the Hollywood grapevine is that another Batman villain has been added to the cast of Suicide Squad.

The Wrap have reported that Lost actor Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje has been cast in the role of Killer Croc.

Akinnuoye-Agbaje, best-known as fan favourite Mr. Eko in the TV drama, will be making the leap from Marvel to DC having starred in Thor: The Dark World as the dark elf Kurse.

Read my whole article at Filmoria.

Film News, Films

News: BAFTA Rising Star nominations announced

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With awards season on the horizon, the nominees have been announced for BAFTA’s EE Rising Star Award.

The five nominees have had a remarkable year between them, and with huge films ahead of them the future sets to be even brighter for them.

Leading the pack is home-grown talent Jack O’Connell. Star of cult TV teen drama Skins, and more recently the lead in the Angelina Jolie directed film Unbroken, O’Connell has gone from the small screen to appearing in huge blockbusters, also appearing in last year’s 300: Rise of An Empire.

Up next is Gugu Mbatha-Raw, who is probably most known as the titular character from 2013 period drama Belle. We’ll see her next in sci-fi flick Jupiter Ascending.

Miles Teller, star of the critically acclaimed, but yet to be released in the UK, Whiplash has also received a well-earned nomination. Teller will star as Reed Richards (Mr. Fantastic) in the upcoming reboot of Fantastic Four.

Margot Robbie is next in the shortlist, most recognisable from her recent role as Naomi Lapaglia in The Wolf Of Wall Street. Robbie has certainly come a long way from her role as Donna Freedman in Australian soap Neighbours, and has been recently cast as two iconic characters in upcoming films; Jane in Tarzan, and Harley Quinn in Suicide Squad.

Finally, rounding off the pack is Shailene Woodley, star of the Divergent series and last year’s blub-fest, The Fault In Our Stars.

I don’t know about you, but my money is on Miles Teller to win. The winner of the EE Rising Star award is selected by public vote, so it really is anyone’s award!

The BAFTA ceremony is on February 8th.

Image taken from BBC News.

Film Reviews, Films

Secret Cinema presents Back to The Future: The Verdict

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After nearly a week of cancellations, the Secret Cinema finally opened its doors to legions of Back To The Future fans on Thursday 31st July. The event, which saw the building of the fictional town of Hill Valley from the hit movie, and stage the Hill Valley Fair, was held in a secret London location. Though punters were sceptical in the lead up to the event, and on the journey from the unmentionable train station to the event itself, all doubts were erased as soon as you set foot onto the property.

Secret Cinema really live up to their name, and all information was withheld until the last possible minute, including the location of the event which was emailed out to revellers just the day before. Unusually for a Secret Cinema event, the film was disclosed which helped to create the hype – normally customers don’t even know what film they’re watching until it rolls on the night.

Armed with dress codes and new identities, attendees could put in as much, or as little, effort as they liked. The result was overwhelming, and it made you feel a part of something special. The word ‘immersive’ has been paraded around a lot in relation to the event, but rightly so.

Read the full article at Filmoria.