Review: Dark Rose Valkyrie

Dark Rose Valkyrie is the latest Japanese role-playing game presented to us by developer Compile Heart and publisher Idea Factory. It’s set in an alternate version of 1929 Japan where Black Garnet, a meteorite, has hit the Earth and caused a virus that transforms the public into deadly creatures called Chimera.  The protagonist, Asahi Shiramine, is the captain of Task Force Valkyrie – a special unit created by a military agency in order to defeat these beings.

Read the rest of my review on Push Square.

Review: Hakuoki: Kyoto Winds

Hakuoki: Kyoto Winds is the latest game in the Hakuoki series, and is billed by developer Idea Factory as a “remastered telling of the beloved 2008 series”. Set in historic Japan, the game follows the protagonist as she’s taken in by a group of samurai while looking for her father who has gone missing. Being an otome game (literally translated as “maiden game”), the protagonist is, naturally, surrounded by attractive men – twelve of whom she is able to embark on romantic storylines with.

Read the rest of my review at Push Square.

Review: Ys Origin

Some eleven years after its original Japanese release, Ys Origin has been brought to PlayStation 4 by publisher DotEmu (via a PC localisation by XSEED back in 2006). Set 700 years before the events of the main Ys series, Origin steers away from the series’ familiar protagonist Adol Christin in order to focus on the background of the series’ story by exploring the world through the eyes of new characters.

Read the rest of my review at Push Square.

Review: MeiQ: Labyrinth of Death

From Compile Heart, the developer of the reasonably popular Hyperdimension Neptunia series, comes a new game from a fresh intellectual property. MeiQ: Labyrinth of Death is the story of a world that is suffering an eternal nighttime. Legend tells the story of a chosen Machina Mage who must turn the key to restart the world and restore order. The world of MeiQ is made up of five parts, and a mage has been selected from each part to partake in the quest. Enter the cast.

Read the rest of my review on Push Square.

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Review: Assassin’s Creed Rogue

As the famous saying goes, “There are three certainties in life: death, taxes, and a new Assassin’s Creed game every year.” At least, that’s how the saying could have gone, until Ubisoft decided to outdo themselves and launch two Assassin’s Creed games on the same day at the tail end of 2014.

With the world and his wife harping on about Ubisoft’s new-gen offering and those screenshots, it was easy to forget our reliable last-gen consoles were also ready to take us back to the sprawling world Ubisoft have carved out, and for the very last time.

Read the rest of my review on This Is My Joystick.

Review: Gods Will Be Watching

They might have been far and few between in the past, but choice-based games are now becoming a prevalent gaming genre. Described as a “point-and-click thriller”, Gods Will Be Watching is set across six chapters, and is a minimalistic foray asking you to set aside your morals in order to solve a series of puzzles. Based on a mini-game created for a Ludum Dare 26 challenge, Gods Will Be Watching was an intriguing game, if nothing else.

Gods Will Be Watching is initially quite frustrating. There is a lack of instruction and objectives, and the first chapter seems to introduce players to a new level of thinking, rather than any story or gameplay elements. It’s because of this that it’s easy to find yourself at the game over screen fairly often. Once you’ve seen it once, you should become accustomed to it because you’ll be seeing it quite regularly.

Read the rest of my review on Filmoria.

Review: The Wolf Among Us – The Crooked Mile

Telltale Games has released the latest episode of The Wolf Among Us across Europe, subtitled The Crooked Mile. With the success of The Walking Dead, Telltale have high expectations to reach with The Wolf Among Us, but episodes 1 and 2 proved that they were up to the challenge.

Readers of Culture Shack will know how much I love this series, you can read my full review over at Filmoria.