2017 Challenges: The Backlog Post

Wow. So, we’re almost in July and I’m only just getting round to making this list which probably tells you about as much as you need to know about how this particular aspect of the 2017 Challenges is going!

I’ve been through my game collection for PS4 and Vita and these are the games I own which I have yet to finish a single playthrough on. So much for no more buying new games until the old ones are finished!

I’m still hopeful that I can burn through a lot of these by the end of the year, but also fully aware that I’m fast running out of time!

  1. Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain
  2. Final Fantasy X
  3. Final Fantasy X-2
  4. Beyond: Two Souls
  5. Murdered: Soul Suspect
  6. Danganronpa 1-2 Reload
  7. Danganronpa: Ultra Despair Girls
  8. Trails of Cold Steel
  9. Tales of Zestiria
  10. Tales of Hearts R
  11. Psycho Pass: Mandatory Happiness
  12. Steins;Gate
  13. Uncharted Collection
  14. Uncharted 4
  15. XBlaze Code: Embryo
  16. Persona 3 Portable
  17. Conception II

I’m hoping that at least a few of these can tie in with the platinum challenge. It looks like I’m clear on new releases until Danganronpa 3 comes out in September, so a good couple of months to focus on these (once I’ve finished Crash Bandicoot: N. Sane Trilogy). 

Platinum Review: Nubla

Desperate times call for desperate measures, and as I faced ending the first half of the year with no platinum trophies I found myself on a forum for “Games with easy platinums” on PSN Profiles. Imagine my delight when I see a game that is hailed as being the easiest platinum trophy ever. I quickly corroborated the fact on PlayStation Trophies, and lo and behold it’s true. The rating on the game’s page was down as 2/10 and estimated time of 0.5-2hrs.

A quick check of the PlayStation Store, and I saw the game was £7.99. Too good an opportunity to pass up.

nubla

So, what is the game? It’s called Nubla, and as a loose plot description it’s about an art gallery that has lost the pictures in its paintings. You control a character and essentially solve puzzles to restore the paintings. For a game that centres around art as you’d expect, the art style is really impressive. It’s unique and charming, and makes the whole game feel like a really special experience.

You get (gold!) trophies for completing each of the games chapters and for collecting each “Dream Memento”, with the platinum popping at the end of the credits.

The collectables are sometimes difficult to spot, and a few are only visible after you trigger a certain art of the environment. There’s no chapter select, so these trophies are missable, but luckily there are some really comprehensive walkthroughs on PlayStation Trophies.

It took me almost an hour to get the platinum trophy for Nubla (around 50 minutes in actual fact), and I used a collectible guide. I’d personally estimate the difficulty at 1/10. The game isn’t diffcult in any way. There are some frustrating moments with the game mechanics, but they don’t affect the playthrough in anyway – you can’t die in the game, there are no platforming moments.

For those interested, there’s also World of Nubla. It’s exactly the same game, but a different trophy list, and comes in at £11.99 on the PlayStation Store.

The problem with Delsin

inFamous: Second Son was the PlayStation 4 game we were all waiting for. The first proper foray into the capabilities of next-gen gaming. For those familiar with Sucker Punch’s previous PS3 titles, it would be the chance to see where the story of conduits would go post-Cole, but for those taking their first venture into the world, it would be a new opportunity to get behind some superpowers of their own.

There’s no doubting that inFamous: Second Son is a great game, with some spectacularly beautiful graphics and brilliant gameplay, but the experience was marred by the unlikeable main character, Delsin Rowe. Cocky, arrogant and immature, the Second Son protagonist epitomises the worst of all the qualities we’ve become accustomed to as comic books and superheroes continue to bombard popular culture.

With two playthroughs for the good karma and bad karma endings, it can feel like a long ride when the main character just feels like a complete jerk. So just where does it all go wrong for Delsin?

Read the rest of my article at This Is My Joystick.