Review: Chaos;Child

Chaos;Child is the latest visual novel brought to us by developer 5pb, and the fourth main entry in the ‘Science Adventure’ series. Chaos;Child sits in that series with acclaimed titles like Steins;Gate and this game’s predecessor, Chaos;Head, but don’t worry too much about having experience with either. Ultimately, playing those will add depth to Chaos;Child, but it’s perfectly enjoyable and works as a standalone game if you haven’t played the others.

Read the rest of my review on Push Square.

chaoschild

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30 Days Of: Gaming, Day 20

Day 20: Favourite genre

I’ll play most genres of games at least once, and there’s nothing really out there that I truly despise. I’m not fond of FPS’s, but recently I’ve been playing a lot of Overwatch so I’m beginning to get past that.

My all-time favourite genre is the JRPG. I just love being able to sink into a huge world, devoting lots of time to something and seeing it through to the very end. Ironic for someone who always complains about having no time on their hands.

30 Days Of: Gaming, Day 19

Day 19: Picture of a game setting you wish you lived in

I’ve talked about moving to Japan a lot, and I think most people with my sort of interests have a dream they lived there, so as a serious answer I’ll go with Tokyo as seen in Persona 5.

p5

As a totally non-serious answer (but still 100% serious), I’ll say any of the Pokémon regions purely so it would mean that I could be a Pokémon trainer (with a speciality in fire, if you’re interested).

30 Days Of: Gaming, Day 18

Day 18: Favourite protagonist

Blame the stalling on this question. It seemed really easy from the outside, then the more I thought about it, the harder it became. I started thinking about my favourite games which naturally led me straight away to Persona 4. No dice there, Yu is kind of bland. The same can be said for most Persona protagonists in a way, opting for one of them feels like a waste. Next my mind jumped to the Danganronpa series. Again, it’s a no. Naegi, as much as I love him, is kind of annoying, and Hinata, though he has more levels than Naegi, is also a negative.

Eventually, this ruling out of basically every game I’ve ever played led me to looking at my trophy list and going through methodically. The choice I’ve picked may surprise those that know me, as I don’t think I’ve ever been a vocal advocate of this game, but here we go.

My choice for my favourite protagonist is Rhys from Tales From The Borderlands. I think this game is severely underrated. I initially just played it for the quick-fix Telltale platinum trophy, but I ended up really loving it mostly in part due to the incredible storyline and the well-developed characters, of whom Rhys was my favourite.

Rhys

Rhys is severely flawed, yes, but he has a lot of great qualities (if you choose the options that let them shine out). I suppose each protagonist in a Telltale game is what you make of them largely due to the choice element of the game, but I found Rhys to be funny, loyal, and just an all-round interesting character to play as.

Review: Dark Rose Valkyrie

Dark Rose Valkyrie is the latest Japanese role-playing game presented to us by developer Compile Heart and publisher Idea Factory. It’s set in an alternate version of 1929 Japan where Black Garnet, a meteorite, has hit the Earth and caused a virus that transforms the public into deadly creatures called Chimera.  The protagonist, Asahi Shiramine, is the captain of Task Force Valkyrie – a special unit created by a military agency in order to defeat these beings.

Read the rest of my review on Push Square.

Review: Touhou Genso Wanderer

Rogue-like role-playing release Touhou Genso Wanderer follows the story of adorable protagonist Reimu Harukei. Reimu becomes entranced by the ‘golden sphere’ that soon-to-be antagonist Rinnosuke Morichika is holding, and tries to steal it from him. Clearly under the sphere’s spell, Rinnosuke fights back, and Reimu soon finds herself away from her home, trying to find her way back and battling the clones which have been borne of the sphere’s dark power. The whole thing feels a little trope-y, and starting the game feels like setting off down a well-worn path, so it’s a good job that it has a lot to throw at you to try and keep you interested.

Read the rest of my review at Push Square.